Meet Vulric at the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Breed Show

Header Photo by Martin Hill

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Club of Great Britain have announced their annual breed show and we couldn’t be more excited to join them on Sunday October 6th. The show is the biggest gathering of the breed in the UK, and is open to observers and those interested in learning more about the breed.

More details will follow, but for now you can keep track on their Facebook and Event pages.

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The event is followed by a fun dog show open to all, this year with a mystery celebrity judge – come compete for your rosette!

How much does a wolfdog cost?

czechoslovakian wolfdog puppy uk

How much does a czechoslovakian wolfdog cost is a common questions on our @Wolfdog_of_London instagram page, so here is the answer in detail for everyone to access. Before we dive in, there are three things to note:

  1. The costs are based on our lifestyle. For example, we do need to pay for daycare, whereas some people are home all day and may not need to… but we also take Vulric to the office or work from home, so our costs are also lower than 
  2. The costs are localized… and London is expensive. You may want to adjust some of the costs for your budget after doing some more research.
  3. Costs can spiral out of control. Life is unpredictable – it is not unheard of for owners of any breed to rack up thousands in vet bills, dogs that were perfectly house trained to develop severe separation anxiety requiring full time petsitting when moving houses… or traumas requiring huge training costs. 

One common variation of the question is “How much does a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog puppy cost?”  and while I will cover this, the ongoing costs are far bigger than the cost of buying the puppy itself. You will see this in detail below – I have divided the costs in sections based on the initial, one-off costs to get started (Outlay) ; the average monthly spend now (Ongoing) and types of unpredictable costs that you should be prepared to cover (Unexpected). 

  1. Outlay – £2,000 one off
    • Puppy – £1,500 : the price may vary, for example an older dog looking for a regime will be cheaper, or puppies that are healthy but have a characteristic that means they can’t be shown or bred (long coat, off color, one ear not stood up are examples)
    • Gear – £500 : this might sound like a lot, but there’s quite a lot to buy to start with: crate, bed, puppy pads, puppy proofing flat, collar, lead, soft harness, wee cleaner, puppy shampoo, blankets…
  1. Ongoing –  £870 per month
    • Daycare / Dog walker – £500 : I don’t believe that dogs should be locked up for 10 hours non stop, so I make sure Vulric is not bored or lonely. He either goes to daycare or has a dog-walker come in for a midday walk. 
    • Good food – £150 : we feed raw, but there are also good kibble or cooked food companies. Very cheap food is filled with fillers, carbs and preservatives. What you save in food costs, you will spend at the vet’s for poor health.
    • Insurance – £60 : accidents or unexpected health issues can quickly add up, see below in the “Vet” section under “unexpected”. Insurance is important.
    • Training – £60 : if you get a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, it’s because you want to work them or take training seriously. For most of us who aren’t professional, this means paying for puppy classes. 
    • Accessories / toys / ad hoc shopping – £50 : things will come up every month, maybe a collar is tattered, the dog lost its ID tag playing, he has outgrown his bed… expect to spend on toys monthly. 
    • Treats / Snacks – £20 : if you train, need distractions out and about, or just know you want to spoil your dog, you will need treats, including high value ones. I opt for 100% meat treats, or make my own. 
    • Flea/Tick/Worm prevention – £20 : most owners seem to treat for parasites regularly, I have opted to feed a natural supplement that prevents fleas and ticks, and also whole prey which acts as a natural wormer, then test for worms regularly. Whichever way you decide to go, it’s another expense on the list. 
    • Supplements – £10 : I feed golden paste and kefir, but there are many different options to supplement dogs’ meals. 
  1. Unexpected – ?
    • Vet – £90 to 20,000 : this is why insurance is important. We have several friends already that have had vet bills in the tens of thousands. 
    • Behaviourist – £250 to 1.000 : a good, qualified behaviorist is not cheap, and this is not something to try and get cheap. 
    • Dog Boarding / Hotel – £100 to 2,000 : holidays now mean finding care for Vulric, depending on the length the bills can get rather hefty. 
    • Medicine / regular supplements – £100 – £2,000 : dogs with health issues are often prescribed supplements, which also add to the cost. 
    • Damage to the house – £100 – £10,000 : any large breed has the capability to wreck havoc in the house if not trained – this can extend to chewing walls, digging up the carpet, jumping through windows in extreme cases. 
    • Become addicted to a dog sport – £100 – £5000 : this is not a joke. Think agility or dog showing looks like good fun? It really is, in fact the eager competitors will often spend thousands to travel around the country, trains and enter shows. You’ve been warned!

So how much does a wolfdog cost? For us just under £1,000 a month. I hope you find the detail helpful, I had to think through everything to budget for our puppy, so perhaps this will save the work for someone looking to get a dog. The costs aren’t wolfdog specific – many owners in our situation would be spending the same on a Labrador. Dogs are not cheap to keep, but Vulric is worth every penny!

To read more about his life beyond the costs, see our Everyday Wolfdog page.

wolfdog puppy great britain

Wolfdog of London Website Launch

Hello, World!

After a year and a half of posting pictures of Mr V on instagram, we have decided to expand his share of the internet by building this little space. Here we can have higher resolution photos and longer blog posts, to spare you some of our essay captions on social media. The other reason for creating this website is to centralise our portfolio for Vulric’s modeling and advertising work, and make it easy for brands to get in touch with us.

Whether you are a friendly follower from Instagram here for fun or stumbled across us for the first time – there will be something for everyone.

We are planning a series of fun posts but if you have any suggestions or requests, leave us a comment! As always, we will make sure to let you know on Instagram when we next publish new content.